With these 7 simple tips, anyone can successfully grow an avocado tree at home. The result? Many years full of delicious and nutritious fruit.

1. Plant a young tree

The easiest way to ensure a healthy plant is to buy a young tree online or from a plant nursery. Trees grown from avocado pits require at least 5 years before producing fruit, and the fruits themselves are often subpar.

2. Choose the right location

Avocados need plenty of sun and frost-free temperatures. However, young trees are susceptible to excessive sunlight. Plant them in the shade of a larger tree or on the northern side of your yard. You can also erect your own shade structure to protect the young plants.

3. Planting multiple trees

The more avocados, the better! If you plant multiple trees outdoors, plant them at least 25 to 30 feet apart. A full-grown avocado tree can have wide canopies, so it needs plenty of space to avoid competition.

4. Avoid over-watering

The soil should be moist, not drenched. Avocado roots can easily begin to rot if they’re left damp. When in doubt, use a moisture meter.

5. Fertilize a few times a year for outside trees

An avocado tree appreciates a good fertilizer a few times a year. Young trees, however, don’t need any fertilizer, so wait until the second year of growth for your first application.

6. Growing indoors

If you live in a cold or temperate climate, consider growing a dwarf variety indoors. These trees grow well in containers.

Choose a container and soil type that both have good drainage, and be sure to fertilize often.

7. Minimal pruning

Avocados don’t need regular pruning except to control the size of the tree. To encourage bushier growth, prune the tree.

You can also remove dead branches, crossing branches, and branches that drag on the ground. If your tree is fruiting age be careful to only prune when the tree is fruiting — that way, you won’t accidentally cut off a branch that produces fruit.

After following these tips, all you need is patience. Young trees will begin to fruit after 3 to 4 years. Mature trees, however, can produce up to 300 fruits per year, so your patience is sure to pay off.

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